Presentation Prizes

The DTP Conference offers students the opportunity to win prizes based on their presentations. There are eight prizes to be won, with four on each day of the conference. 

  • Critics’ Choice Award for Best Oral Presentation (10th September)
  • Critics’ Choice Award for Best Poster Presentation (10th September)
  • People's Choice Award for Best Oral Presentation (10th September)
  • People's Choice Award for Best Poster Presentation (10th September)
  • Critics’ Choice Award for Best Oral Presentation (11th September)
  • Critics’ Choice Award for Best Poster Presentation (11th September)
  • People's Choice Award for Best Oral Presentation (11th September)
  • People's Choice Award for Best Poster Presentation (11th September)

Please note that all prizes will be awarded during the Closing Remarks on Tuesday, 11th September. Winners that are not present will be able to collect their prizes at a later date. The major difference between the prizes concerns the difference between the 'People's Choice' and the 'Critics' Choice'.


People's Choice

On each day, attendees will be able to vote for their favourite oral presentation, and their favourite poster presentation. Voting will open at the end of the day, after all sessions have ended. The criteria attendees use to decide the 'best' presentation is up to each individual, but we would encourage everyone to vote objectively. Instructions on how to vote in the People's Choice category will be provided during the Closing Remarks section of the conference on Monday 11th September and before the Workshop on Tuesday 12th September.


Critics' Choice

A collection of judges (academics and external organisations) will assess presentations on a set of criteria. This year the judging criteria will focus on three aspects:

  1. Aesthetic - design, style, well formatted figures, only relevant information shown, no background images cluttering the presentation.
  2. Accessibility - easy to read, understandable to a non-specialist audience, clear narrative, explained acronyms, free of jargon.
  3. Communication - speaker enthusiasm, flow of presentation, clear oration, clarity of research aims, clarity of potential or real impacts of research.

Judges can mark the three categories out of six (6 - Phenomenal, 5 - Excellent, 4 - Very Good, 3 - Good, 2 - Fair, 1 - Poor). All the votes from the judges will coallated and averaged at the end of each day. The students with the highest average mark for their oral or poster presentation will win the prizes for that day. It is important to note that the judging criteria focuses on science communication, rather than the quality or topic of the science. The above criteria will be used to assess both oral and poster presentations. 


General Advice

In terms of presentation quality, peer feedback from previous conferences have emphasised the need for the following:

  • To speak clearly and audibly ensuring you communicate your science effectively.
  • Be enthusiastic and engage the audience in your presentation. 
  • Present facing the audience and not the slide/poster.
  • Word your talk for the multi-disciplinary audience, ensuring to remove jargon.
  • Diagrams and figures are great visual tools to convey concepts and methodologies without wordy-heavy explanations.
  • Try to avoid over-filling slides or a poster with information.
  • A focus on the broader strokes and implications of your research may help the audience greater access your presentation.
  • Especially in the case of oral talks, presenters should provide a narrative to the information shown, avoiding the pit-fall of reading off the projection.